ADLI MINI-FEST 2014

Date: Wednesday February 26 - Sunday, March 2, 2014
Location: Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, Providence, RI (Angell Street between Thayer & Brown Streets)
Information/Box Office: info@adli.us, 401-863-5488

Mini-Fest Concert
featuring independent women of Rhode Island
Friday February 28 - 8:00 pm
Saturday March 1 - 8:00 pm
Granoff Studio One
Tickets: $15 General/$5 Students
BUY TICKETS NOW!

Master Classes
Cathy Young, Jazz Technique
Saturday March 1st - 10:00am
Granoff Studio One
Free and open to the public
REGISTER - space is limited

B.J. Sullivan, Safety Release Technique
Sunday March 2nd - 11:30am
Ashamu Dance Studio *note different location*
Free and open to the public
REGISTER - space is limited
Lecture Demonstration:
Dance, Memory, and the Oral Tradition

featuring dancers with Parkinson’s Disease and
students from Central Falls High School

Saturday March 1st - 12:00pm
Granoff Studio One
Free and open to the public

Interactive Exhibits and Installations
curated by Brown Public Humanities graduate
students and Dancing Legacy Apprentices

February 26-27 - 10am-4pm
February 28 & March 1 - 10am-10pm
Granoff Living Room Galleries
Free and open to the public

ADLI Mini-Fest 2014 is part of Widening the Circle: Intersections of Art, Science and Community, a series of master classes, lecture demonstrations, performances, and seminars February 21-March 8 presented by FirstWorks and American Dance Legacy Initiative, in collaboration with Artists and Scientists as Partners, Brown University, and Mark Morris Dance Group. For more information about the entire series, visit: Widening the Circle



MINI-FEST CONCERT
featuring independent women of Rhode Island
Friday February 28 - 8:00 pm
Saturday March 1 - 8:00 pm
Granoff Studio One
Tickets: $15 General/$5 Students
BUY TICKETS NOW!


Dancing Legacy's Amy Burns
Photo Credit: Lucia Lopez


Join our welcoming, innovative community for a performance of engaging, eclectic, and enjoyable dancing! Mini-Fest Concert 2014 celebrates independent women of Rhode Island. The local and guest artists featured in the performance embody Rhode Island's trademark trailblazing spirit. Anchoring the program is Dancing Legacy, the performing and teaching ensemble of American Dance Legacy Initiative, in works covering three decades of American dance. Dancing Legacy local dancers Laura Bennett, Amy Burns, Kerry Gallagher, and Hayley Kenney will be joined by local guest artists Shura Baryshnikov, Nikki Carrara, Donna McGuire, and Stephanie Turner and North Carolina-based choreographer/performer, B.J. Sullivan. The Mini-Fest Concert also features Dance Extension, Brown University’s modern repertory company.

Highlights of the concert are Buraczeski Etude, a distillation of the repertory and style of jazz master Danny Buraczeski, Anne-Alex Packard’s whimsical and humorous Angels in the Attic, and Donna Jewell’s seminal work, Madame Sand, inspired by the life of writer George Sand and the music of Frederic Chopin. B.J. Sullivan, whose work has been described as unique, fluid, and physical, will perform an excerpt from The Pressure Series, which considers the transition from a life focused on self into one consumed by nurturing and caregiving and the struggles of balancing career and home. Stephanie Turner, independent choreographer/performer and director of the Movement Exchange, will contribute a new work, Loose Seam, to live music. The program is completed with works by Dancing Legacy’s Marisa Ballaro and Brown University choreographers, Sarah Friedland and Nadia Hannan.



MASTER CLASS WITH CATHY YOUNG
Jazz Technique
Saturday March 1st - 10:00am
Granoff Studio One
Free and open to the public
REGISTER - space is limited


Cathy Young is nationally recognized as a master teacher and has taught classes at more than 30 colleges around the country, as well as at the Bates Dance Festival, Florida Dance Festival and the International Open Look Festival in St. Petersburg, Russia. As a performer, Young has danced with a number of companies, including Zenon Dance Company and Danny Buraczeski’s JAZZDANCE, and has toured extensively throughout the US and Europe. For the past 20 years, Young has focused on creating her own work, a dynamic mix of styles and dance forms, for her own company Cathy Young Dance, and she has been commissioned by major companies around the world. She was previously department chair at Ursinus College in Pennsylvania and now proudly serves as director of the Dance Division for The Boston Conservatory.

Young’s classes celebrate jazz dance as a dynamic, expressive, complex, and continuously evolving form. Because jazz dance is inspired by vernacular dance and music, her classes explore movement that has its roots in African-American dances such as the Cakewalk, the Charleston, the Lindy Hop and hip hop as well as the Mambo and Salsa of Latin America. Young integrates the complexity of elements from current and classical jazz movement techniques with somatics. Her warm-up is organic and "body-friendly," yet also physically rigorous. The movement explores a wide range of jazz styles with a focus on elements such as isolation, swing, pulse, and rhythmic variations. All levels of dancers are welcome.


MASTER CLASS WITH B.J. SULLIVAN
Safety Release Technique
Sunday March 2nd - 11:30am
Ashamu Dance Studio *note different location*
Free and open to the public
REGISTER - space is limited

B.J. Sullivan, dance teacher / choreographer / performer, is active in the development of post modern dance technique. As a tenured associate professor at the University of North Carolina Greensboro, her research is in choreography and her applied technique. Gaining recognition for the teaching methods of her own style and floor work, Sullivan coined this body of material "Safety Release Technique". She has traveled extensively teaching SRT at many universities and professional schools globally including Dance New Amsterdam in New York City and serving on the summer faculties of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts and Interlochen Arts Academy.

Safety Release Technique combines the health practicalities of human movement with the breadth and depth of artistic possibility. SRT skillfully blends multiple layers of movement principles while informing dancing with a mixture of somatic and release applications. In preparation for full-bodied and vivid expressiveness the classes begin on the floor and progressively develop into full-range combinations. Sullivan's style encourages students to comprehend "flow of motion" through the body and through changes in level, challenging their ability to get into and out of the floor easily.





Rachel Balaban leading her Dance for PD® class in ADLI Mini-Fest 2013
Photo Credit: Lucia Lopez
LECTURE DEMONSTRATION:
DANCE, MEMORY, AND THE ORAL TRADITION

featuring dancers with Parkinson’s Disease and students from Central Falls High School
Saturday March 1st - 12:00pm
Granoff Studio One
Free and open to the public

Part performance and part discussion, "Dance, Memory, and the Oral Tradition” will include presentations by persons with Parkinson's Disease and by students from Central Falls High School. In addition, Cathy Young, former dancer with Danny Buraczeski’s dance company, JAZZDANCE, will share how Buraczeski’s legacy is being preserved through ADLI’s Repertory Etudes Project. Rounding out the program, Jeff Friedman, a dancer, choreographer, reconstructor, documentarian, and scholar, will demonstrate the use of oral history to preserve the memories of dancers.


INTERACTIVE EXHIBITS AND INSTALLATIONS
curated by Brown Public Humanities graduate students and Dancing Legacy Apprentices
February 26-27 - 10am-4pm
February 28 & March 1 - 10am-10pm
Granoff Living Room Galleries
Free and open to the public

The Mini-Fest installations take full advantage of the Granoff Center, Brown University's interdisciplinary arts center dedicated to fostering innovation, research, collaboration, creativity, and education among the arts, humanities, and sciences. The building was designed by the New York-based architecture firm, Diller Scofidio + Renfro. The exhibits will be situated throughout the building and provide new perspectives on viewing and experiencing dance.

Two of the installations are inspired by the work of American jazz master, Danny Buraczeski, curated by students from Central Falls High School under the direction of their master teacher Deanna Camputaro and Paul Margrave, a Brown University Public Humanities graduate student. By combining photographs, video, text and choreography, the students share their personal connection to Danny Buraczeski and his repertory. Two exhibits explore “Dance, Memory, and the Oral Tradition” showcasing ADLI’s archives and programming. The final exhibit is presented in partnership with ASaP: Artists and Scientists as Partners.

ADLI Installation in the Granoff Center 2013
Photo Credit: Lucia Lopez
ADLI Mini-Fest 2014 was made possible with support from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Brown University Creative Arts Council, the Brown Department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies, the Brown Center for Public Humanities, and the Susan Benenson Fund.



Check out this video to get a taste of what happens at the ADLI Mini-Fest...


To learn more about ADLI and Repertory Etudes, see below.


What We Do

ADLI produces innovative materials and programs designed to engage artists, educators, and the general public with participatory viewing and dancing experiences that connect with American heritage, building a dance literate public. Founded in 1993 by dance pioneers Carolyn Adams and Julie Adams Strandberg, ADLI is housed at Brown University’s John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage to strengthen a shared commitment to public engagement with the arts and culture. Operating on a project-by-project basis, ADLI partners with a broad, geographically diverse network of organizations, inter-generational practitioners, and dance enthusiasts to carry out activities on Brown’s campus and in communities across the nation. These activities include:
  • Repertory EtudesTM Collection: Assisting dance artists in the passing on of their work through developing Repertory EtudesTM (short dances based on signature works of American choreographers) and assembling archival materials through interactive projects involving a range of practitioners and scholars from diverse viewpoints
  • Residencies: Offering Repertory EtudeTM residencies that build literacy, investigate authenticity, and nurture an individual relationship to the dances
  • Events: Producing workshops, performances, installations, exhibits, and Mini-Fests designed to engage participants with multiple points of entry
  • Professional Development: Providing training in ADLI’s teaching methodology and workshops for practitioners in dance, arts, and cultural heritage
  • Community Engagement: Bringing together Brown, the greater Providence community, and the nation to celebrate America’s rich dance heritage together through ongoing and stand-alone workshops and projects
Repertory EtudesTM
Repertory EtudesTM are short dances based on signature works of American choreographers, available to the public with unprecedented access for study, viewing, and performance.Now, just as anyone can study and perform music from Bach to Duke Ellington or theatre from Shakespeare to Tennessee Williams, ADLI grants access to dance works by historical and contemporary choreographers on an ongoing and intimate basis.


See VIDEOS of RepEtudesTM
A revolutionary concept in the field of dance, these challenging studies stand on their own as concert pieces and also as rich tools for improving dance technique and performance skills. They provide any individual, particularly an educator, with usable source material for lifelong learning about dance. Repertory EtudesTM offer the opportunity to explore, discuss, and appreciate American dance’s personal and cultural relevance.